Current News

Welcome back Cory!

Ascendion is extremely pleased to welcome back Cory Russell as an Associate Lawyer.

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A Case for Electronic Trials

As the vaccinated population grows and the global health crisis begins to stabilize, leaders in every profession face the question of what the work-life landscape should look like.

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Appointment to Chair

The Canadian Bar Association established the Business Practice & Innovation Committee with the purpose of keeping a pulse on trends and other significant events that may impact the legal community. I am honoured to be named chair of the CBABC committee in the coming year. 

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Managing the Hybrid Workforce

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted us in many ways, including how we work. Hybrid workforces with flexible hours have become part of our everyday practice and, in many places, even expected.
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Even Silence May Breach the Duty of Honest Contractual Performance

In December 2020, the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) decided in C.M. Callow Inc. v. Zollinger [1], refining and expanding the contractual duty of honest performance recognized in Bhasin v. Hrynew [2].

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Welcome to Janessa

Welcome to Janessa! We are thrilled to announce the arrival of Associate Lawyer, Janessa Mason, to the Ascendion team.

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From the Courtroom to Zoom

In early June, I acted as counsel for the British Columbia College of Nursing Professionals (the largest regulatory health college in the Province) in a two-day appeal. In a future post

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Farewell to Cory and Welcoming Chelsea

We welcome Chelsea Salindong to the Ascendion Law team as our new Legal Administrative Assistant.

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Legislating a suspension of breach of contract due to COVID-19

The provincial government should introduce legislation to prohibit the right to sue for breach of contract when the alleged breach is

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The benefits of decision analysis

Most litigators who have benefitted from participating as counsel in a few trials can assess, with reasonable confidence, whether their client has a "strong" or a "weak" case.

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